Archive of ‘macrobiotic’ category

Get Fit at Whole Foods

Tuesday‘s exercise: the Get Fit with Catra workout (went with Jill) consisted of…

  • 10 standing lunges
  • 10 walking lungues
  • 10 pushups
  • 1 lap around the park (< quarter mile?)

Repeat 3 times.

We also walked to and from the park, so I’d add at least another quarter mile to that. It took about 40 minutes total. I think my time for the 3 cycles was about 10 minutes, but we did stretching before and I’m also counting the walking time. During the day I walked a lot (shopping) and I think I did some of the DVF exercises in the morning.

Wednesday I did the Diane von Furstenburg exercises again. I love these. They are so simple. I did most of them while watching “Faces of Culture“, a video series that I have to watch for one of my anthropology classes. I also walked 2 miles – 1 mile each way to and from the grocery store.

Viva la VIA

I have never been a coffee person. I do not own a coffee machine, and I never saw the appeal of choking down the dark chestnut colored concoction anyway. I thought it was bitter. Tea always won out. Until now. Until Starbucks VIA. Disclaimer: Starbucks did not ask me to write this, I just happen to love it and I want to share my new find .

columbia via

Bobby tried VIA last week in some kind of taste test, and he said it was really good. He’s not really a coffee person, so I thought he might be on to something. I picked up a pack of 12 instant coffees in the Columbia flavor. I think it was $9.95 for the pack? That’s a decent price for coffee that tastes great, in my opinion. It’s less than $1 a cup. It’s simple to make; you just pour hot water over the coffee and stir. They have another flavor, the Italian Roast, which is stronger.

Recipe: Gingery Chickpeas

This recipe is so simple. It’s based off of a recipe from Meg Wolff (remember my macrobiotic experiment?). Here are my thoughts on macrobiotics (I love it):

Gingery Chickpeas

Ingredients

  • 1 can chickpeas, drained (~2 cups)
  • 1 small/medium onion, roughly chopped
  • 2-3 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1-2 tablespoons grated ginger
  • salt, to taste
  • <1/4 cup water

Directions

  1. Heat the oil in a wok/pan over high heat. Add the ginger and chopped onion; saute for 2-3 minutes (it should start to smell really good).
  2. Add the chickpeas and saute for another 3-4 minutes.
  3. Add a few tablespoons of water to the pan and stir everything around. As the water evaporates, mash a few of the chickpeas so that some are mushed and some are still whole. Add salt, to taste.

Recipe: Spicy Burdock Root Salad

Remember how I love Delica so much? Delica is that awesome Japanese delicatessen located in the Ferry Building in San Francisco.

I finally figured out their recipe for the Spicy Burdock Root Salad. Their salad has lotus root, but I was all out. I subbed in water chestnuts instead. Theirs also has mizuna (a salad green), but I didn’t have that either so I just left it out. The ingredient list looks long, I know – but it’s really very simple. Texture is really important here, so make sure the onion and celery are both sliced very thinly. My mandoline helped me achieve the awesome textures, but a grater would work just as well; so would a lot of patience with a knife.

I kid you not – this will be the best salad you ever make.

More Delica yums (San Francisco), oatmeal, & working out!

On Wednesday Bobby and I were up in San Francisco again for a job interview (Bobby’s). We had to go to Delica rf-1 again; we go there almost every time we are in SF. Delica is a sweet little Japanese deli/delicatessen with takeout foods. They have salads, bento boxes, soups, and other cute Japanese dishes.

I got almost the same thing as I did last time (3 salad combo), except I doubled up on the Spicy Burdock Root Salad (A spicy mix of braised burdock and konnyaku (mountain potato) tossed with thin slices of white onion, celery, julienne carrots, and wild mizuna), and got a single a serving of Hijiki and Soybean Salad (Hijiki (seaweed rich in calcium, iron, and fiber) mixed with dried soybeans, edamame, konnyaku (mountain potato), daikon, wild mizuna, fried tofu, and kuko (wolfberry)).

06 maggie delica

Recipe: Rice Cooker Oatmeal

At my blogger meetup on Sunday I had one of the best bowls of oatmeal ever. I knew I had to figure out how to make such a voluminous, creamy, textured bowl of oats. Well, I did it yesterday. This method rocks. I’m thinking it would probably work in a crockpot as well – have you ever tried that?

Anyway, this is my method for rice cooker oats. They come out so creamy and delicious. They were actually better than the oats I had on Sunday.

Rice Cooker Oatmeal

32 rice cooker oatmeal

Ingredients (serves 1-2)

  • 1 cup oats
  • 2 and 1/3 cups water
  • 2 dashes of salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon stevia (optional)
  • toppings: chopped dates, granola, crushed raw cashews

Directions

  1. Dump the water, salt, cinnamon, vanilla, and stevia in the rice cooker. Press “cook”.

Does cooking make us human?

A few weeks ago, raw food was abuzz in blogland. I gave it a try to help my digestion, but that way of eating didn’t work for me. Now that it’s fall I’ve noticed less and less talk about raw food, and more and more posts about oatmeal, baked squash, and delicious apples. It’s propitious that Bobby alerted me to this article yesterday… Did Cooking Give Humans An Evolutionary Edge? – a transcript of an NPR talk from Science Friday. It has to do with the differences between humans and other primates (like this gorilla that lives in the San Francisco zoo)…

537px-Male_gorilla_in_SF_zoo

I thought the transcript was incredibly interesting. You can also listen to the program (it’s just under 30 minutes). If you don’t have time to read or listen though, I’ll summarize here…

San Francisco Eats

On Sunday’s blogger meetup we went to a cozy little cafe called Bread & Cocoa on Sutter Street in San Francisco. How could I resist the $2.99 oatmeal?

28 oatmeal

It was a humongous bowl, so I went pretty easy on the toppings. I had raisins, almonds, and in-house granola. I also added a little bit of skim milk. I actually managed to finish all but 1 bite of this gigantic bowl of oats. I brought the bloggies some homemade tea bags…

27 tea presents

For lunch we went to the Ferry Building to get our favorite – Delica rf-1. It’s a Japanese delicatessen with the most amazing salads. I got the 3-salad combo; Bobby got the 2-salad + a main item combo. Bobby got Wasabi Garlic Potato Salad (Garlic potato salad with wasabi mayonnaise, edamame, snap peas, and romaine hearts), Spicy Burdock Root Salad (A spicy mix of braised burdock and konnyaku (mountain potato) tossed with thin slices of white onion, celery, julienne carrots, and wild mizuna), and for the main item he got Tofu & Chicken Patty with Hijiki (Free-range chicken and organic tofu patty with hijiki seaweed and carrot; served in a sweet soy sauce).

Sealeg Salad (imitation crab meat)

This is actually a dairy-free recipe! I used canola-oil vegan mayo from Whole Foods.

10 seafood salad

Ingredients

  • 1 package of imitation crab meat (2.5 servings)
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1/2 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 stalks of celery, chopped
  • 2 small pickles, chopped (I used Chinese pickles)
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • other spices (chili powder, dried onion, whatever else you like)
  • salt & pepper, to taste
  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise (vegan canola oil mayo)
  • 2 tablespoons mustard
  • 2-3 tablespoons rice vinegar

09 unmixed seafood salad

Directions

Break apart the crab meat. Mix everything well. EAT.

08 unmixed seafood salad

Bobby liked his on fresh toasty bread; I liked mine plain. I think I had this with some roasted squash on the side.

I’ve been roasting squash a la Clare: cut up in pieces at 425F for 25 minutes. Here was delicata:

Quinoa “Tabbouleh”

This is a simple recipe with a new (to me) grain. I think I saw it on Heather’s blog, but I’d already been itching to try it for a while. It’s now a favorite. Bobby loves quinoa too, and he especially loved this dish. We couldn’t get enough. Quinoa is not a true grain; it’s actually a grass. It’s related to beets, spinach, and tumbleweeds. Did you know its leaves can be eaten as a leafy vegetable? Unfortunately, they’re not widely available.

The Incas actually thought quinoa was sacred; they called it the “mother of all grains”. And it is a wonderful grain: it has high protein content (good for vegans and vegetarians) and includes an array of amino acids, which makes it a complete protein; it’s a good source of dietary fiber, magnesium, phosphorus, and iron; it’s even gluten-free and easy to digest.

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