Posts Tagged ‘vegetarian’

Beet Greens Goma-ae {Recipe}

Here’s another recipe I made a little while ago.

You don’t have to toss your beet greens in the trash – they can be cooked just like any other green. Dark leafy greens are yummy and of course good for you.

Goma-ae is a Japanese dish. Goma = sesame seed. Traditionally this is served with spinach, but I thought that beet greens would be a good seasonal variation on the standard recipe.

Beet Greens Goma-ae


  • 3-4 cups of beet greens (including stems)
  • 2 tablespoons of dark soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1-2 tablespoons ground toasted black sesame seeds


  1. Steam the beet greens for 3 minutes.
  2. Mix the soy sauce and sugar at the bottom of a large serving bowl.
  3. Dry the greens and chop them into small pieces. Add them to the soy sauce mix.
  4. Mix in the ground sesame seeds.
  5. Eat!

Inspiration from {HERE}.

Have you had goma-ae?

What’s your favorite dark leafy green?

Roasted Beets {Recipe}

This is a super simple recipe for roasted beets. This is the technique I use for almost all roasted veggies. Sesame oil is always optional but can be added for some extra depth. It really gives a nice smoky flavor if you use toasted sesame oil.

Simple Roasted Veggies: Beets


  • 4 large beets
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • salt & pepper (1/2 teaspoon salt, pepper to taste?)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds
  • 2 teaspoons dried basil OR a handfull of fresh basil


  1. Preheat oven to 400F.
  2. Mix together the olive oil, (optional) sesame oil, salt and pepper, and sesame seeds.
  3. Chop the beets in approximately 1-inch cubes and toss them in the olive oil mixture.
  4. Bake on an oiled baking sheet (I like to use foil for easy cleanup) for 35 minutes or until tender.
  5. Sprinkle with basil; serve.

Inspiration found {HERE}.

Do you like beets?

I always have. Growing up we would have pickled beets often (one of my Grammie’s recipes). I didn’t have roasted beets until I was probably in my 20s but I loved them at first bite.

Roasted Sesame Eggplant {Recipe}

I made this a few weeks ago, but it was very delicious and it’s worthy of a post. Farmers’ markets have started to have some really delicious eggplant. It’s a summer / early fall vegetable.

Roasted Sesame Eggplant


  • Eggplant
  • Sesame Oil
  • Salt & Pepper
  • Ground black sesame or regular sesame (optional)


  1. Preheat the oven to 400F.
  2. Cut the eggplants in half, and then in 2-3 inch pieces.
  3. Place the eggplants facing up on a greased baking tin. Drizzle with sesame oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and sesame (optional).
  4. Bake for 25-30 minutes. They should be starting to get a little bit mushy so they will be really flavorful.

Inspiration for this recipe came from {HERE}.

Great served as a side or for snacking.

Juicing Infographic!

Hi guys!

I have a *juicy* infographic for you today.

I am a big fan of juicing. I don’t do it that much at home anymore, but I used to use my Breville constantly when I lived out in CA.

Now I tend to buy my juices, but if you have the time and the space for a juicer I’d highly recommend it.

Since moving into my second trimester, I’ve had a lot of trouble with sloooooowwwww digestion and bloating. I don’t like to skip out on the veggies so I try to get them in with juice if I’m not feeling so hot.

When Macy’s sent me an infographic they made about the benefits of juicing I thought it was good timing to post it!

What’s your favorite juice recipe? I love green juices – kale, celery, cucumber, maybe 1/2 an apple, some lemon, and ginger. Yum.

The Benefits of Home Juicing Infographic by Macy’s.

This post is sponsored by Macy’s. I was invited to this opportunity by Blue Polo Interactive and received a Macy’s gift card for my time. All opinions expressed in this post are my own.

Super Simple French Toast {Recipe}

This morning I was really craving French toast.


I had some delicious bread from Eataly, some farmers’ market eggs to use up, and some leftover organic milk from when I made yogurt last week. (Note to self: must make yogurt again!)

I actually made this same recipe a few days ago, and it was so good that it merited a repeat.

The Simplest Easiest French Toast


  • Stale bread (or not stale, but this is great for using up stale bread)
  • 1/2 cup milk (I used 2%)
  • 3 eggs
  • Butter/ghee


Mix the milk and eggs together. Soak the bread in the mixture for at least 5 minutes on each side.

Heat the butter or ghee in a pan. With heat on low, cook the soaked bread (poor any extra mixture that didn’t soak in right on top of the slices).

Cook for 6-8 minutes per side. I like to keep a lid on the pan for the first half (3-4 minutes) of each side.

Enjoy with butter and syrup!

Note that you could add some cinnamon (either into the egg mixture or just sprinkled on as it’s cooking), but my husband hates cinnamon and I wanted him to eat this, so I left it out.

I can usually have a little more than a third of this recipe for breakfast – about 2.5 or 3 pieces. The next day when I only have 1 or 1.5 slices left (because Bobby also had a third or more), I will have it along with a yogurt.

What is your favorite breakfast?

I love French toast, waffles, pancakes. I won’t ever eat them in a restaurant because the restaurant can’t make them like my dad can. In a restaurant I will get an omelette or an egg platter – pretty hard to mess up eggs (though it has happened).

Simple Egg Salad Sandwiches {Recipe}

Every Sunday morning I go to the farmers’ market. There is one right on the corner of my block. Today I got delicious fresh bread from Bread Alone (Whole Wheat Catskill Bread) and eggs from my favorite organic stand.

In my fridge I have a jar of homemade dill pickles from Maria.

Of course I had to make egg salad.

We each ended up having 2x what you see here. (Bobby’s is the one with sriracha, mine is the regular.)

Simple Egg Salad Sandwiches

egg salad


  • 5 small-medium eggs (if you have bigger eggs, 4 will suffice)
  • 3-4 tablespoons mayo (don’t skimp – this is what makes it good)
  • 2 teaspoons mustard
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped dill pickle
  • < 1/4 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt (you don’t need much; the pickles have salt)
  • pepper to taste
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar (optional – if you want more tang)


To hard-boil the eggs:  put eggs in a pan in water with ~1 inch of water above them. Turn the heat to high. Once boiling, let it boil for one minute. Remove from heat and let them sit in the hot water for ~15 minutes. Then dunk in ice-cold water for 3-5 minutes. (This makes it easier to take the shell off.) Crack the shell and remove it.

Chop the eggs in small pieces. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix well.

Serve on top of fresh bread.

Do you like egg salad? What do you put in your favorite version?

Bhakti Immersion Retreat 2013

I have really been MIA lately. One reason: I was on a yoga retreat for 4 days the weekend before last. We did the same retreat last August and loved it so of course we signed up as soon as registration opened this year.

I took no pictures because we left our phones in our cabin the whole time – completely technology-free weekend. It was wonderful!

Here is one picture via Instagram (Bobby and I are in there, not sure if you can see…)



Bobby is in a black sweatshirt behind the girl with the yellow scarf. I’m to his right in a grey sweatshirt behind the girl with a red plaid scarf. We went with another couple who are into yoga just as much as we are – Bobby’s coworker and his girlfriend. We all loved it!

This was definitely not your typical yoga retreat – it could be very spiritual, but also very much “take what you want and leave the rest” at the same time. I would say about half the people there were there for the spiritual part and half for the yoga. It was a great mix of very kind and warm people.

Incredible teachers:

All 3 yoga teachers were amazing – each offering something different but valuable. I listened to a couple talks by the two swamis, who were both inspiring and wise. We learned to play the harmonium with Gaura Vani, who was so talented. Bobby and I took 2 workshops in “Marma Therapy” (ayurvedic massage) with the ayurvedic practitioners. Marma and yoga were definitely the highlights of the retreat for me.


Buffet line + salad bar! (Source)

At the retreat we were treated to 3 vegetarian buffet meals a day. Most of the food was grown on the grounds of the retreat center (Pumpkin Hollow Farm in Craryville, NY – about 2 hours north of the city). It was delicious and Bobby and I totally overate the entire time. But neither one of us came back even a pound heavier, so we must have been burning it off with the 2x a day yoga sessions.

Here is a video from last year’s retreat.

Another reason I have been MIA – I have been working on a new project! I’ll share soon.

What have you been up to lately? Have you ever done a yoga retreat?

Foraged Chanterelles (Mushrooms)

Over the weekend my sister and mom came up to NYC to visit me.

Julia (sister) brought me some chanterelles that my brother, Rob, and his girlfriend had foraged.

I didn’t take a picture before, but here is the after…


Simply roasted for 12 minutes at 450F. Drizzled with olive oil and some sea salt before roasting.

Yum yum.

This roasting method (evoo + sea salt, roast for 10-14 mins @ 450F depending on the mushroom) is my go-to recipe for all kinds of mushrooms.

Here are some mushrooms from another night (maitake on the upper left and beech -I think- on the right; these are organic and from a Japanese grocery store on 59th street).

japanese maitake mushrooms beech

Always delicious.

What’s your favorite way to have mushrooms? What’s your favorite mushroom?

I think my favorite kind of mushroom is maitake, prepared this way.

July Shenanigans & Recipes…

This summer has been one of the best.

Bobby and I have been cooking up a storm…


^^A moscow mule (a drink my dad introduced me to).^^

This was mine, but I gave it to Bobby – after one sip I didn’t want anymore! It’s delicious but I wasn’t in a drinking mood. {HERE} is the recipe I posted 5 years ago when my dad first told me about it. It’s a mix of ginger beer, vodka, lime, and mint. Sometimes we do half seltzer / half ginger beer. Gingerale also works.


^^Sweet and Savory Tempeh with Onions^^

I started off following Gwyneth Paltrow’s recipe for Tempe Manis (Sweet Tempeh) but changed it… a lot. As you guys know, I’m not really into sweets that much, so I cut out just about all the sugar, and instead caramelized some onions to give it sweetness. I will hopefully remember what I did so I can post my version of the recipe later. So delicious.


^^Kale & Seaweed Salad with Avocado – Except with Mustard Greens because I mistakenly grabbed the wrong bunch of greens!^^

Another Gwyneth Paltrow recipe. Which she actually got from Cafe Gratitude (in LA I think?). {HERE} is her recipe. I changed it a bit – I only used one avocado, I didn’t add the cucumbers (all of a sudden I am hating cucumbers, weird!), and I accidentally bought mustard greens instead of kale. I’ve remade it with kale and I actually prefer it with mustard greens. They don’t come out bitter.


^^Random plate^^

This plate has a veggie stir-fry that was *amazing* – it has fake chicken from Trader Joe’s, but aside from that I don’t know what’s in it because Bobby (a budding cook, apparently) made it. I’ve also been *loving* white rice. Having it almost daily, in large amounts. My appetite has been interesting the last month or so. In this pic there is also kabocha (simply steamed, though I have another kabocha recipe I’ve been meaning to share), Rachel Ray’s sesame green beans, a cucumber salad (before I started hating cucumbers), and roasted mushrooms – I think these were oyster mushrooms.




This is a fermented soybean product that is eaten a lot in Japan. It has an interesting (funky) smell and it’s slimy/stringy like okra (only more so). It’s definitely an acquired taste, but I have learned to love it. In fact, Bobby made a batch of homemade natto this week, which is aging in the fridge right now. It should be ready this weekend.

Aside from lots of good eats, other wonderful things have happened recently.

I got to meet my close friend’s baby:


She is so sweet. So cuddly and adorable.

And Bo the cat is a weirdo 😉


I can’t believe I caught that picture! I was reorganizing the area next to my washer/dryer and was taking these shelves downstairs, but Bo decided to hang out in the shelf and I got him mid-yawn.

What have you been up to the past couple of weeks?

{Macrobiotic March} What is a Macro Plate?

A Macro Plate is the quintessential macrobiotic meal.


It’s a perfectly balanced plate of macrobiotic foods. My favorite macro plate consists of…

10 macro plate souen extra kabocha

  • Brown rice
  • Beans or tofu
  • Seaweed (hijiki is probably the most common)
  • Steamed greens (kale, collards, chard)
  • Steamed broccoli
  • Steamed carrot or sweet potato
  • KABOCHA or other squash
  • Dipping sauce (I like tahini-based ones)

What does perfectly balanced mean exactly? This goes back to the concept of yin and yang that I touched on earlier this month. Foods (and everything, really) can have yin qualities (expansive, cooling, moist) or yang qualities (contractive, warming, dry). We should try to avoid things that are way off on either side of the spectrum. Let’s go through the list of foods in a macro plate…

  • Brown rice –> this whole grain has almost equal parts yin and yang.
  • Beans, tofu, and tempeh –> these foods are also in the middle of the yin to yang spectrum.
  • Sea vegetables –> in the middle of the spectrum.
  • Leafy green vegetables (greens) and round vegetables (I guess broccoli?) –> in the middle.
  • Root vegetables –> in the middle of the spectrum.
  • Kabocha / squash –> Do these count as ’round’ veggies? They are also in the midde.
  • Tahini dipping sauce –> nuts are in the middle, but miso (salty – which I like in dipping sauce as well) starts to veer to the yang side of the spectrum.

Overall, a very balanced plate. If you were wondering, fish is a moderate food, though other meats (poultry, red meat, and eggs) are yang. Dairy is on the yin side.

I made a semi-macro plate just last night. I say semi because it had a fried egg on it and as I noted above, eggs are yang. Eggs are even more yang than poultry because they compress all the energy of a chicken into one small egg. That makes sense, right?


This was…

  • Sauteed greens
  • Brown rice (hiding)
  • Avocado
  • Kabocha squash
  • Fried egg + ground sesame on top (it had a runny yolk – it’s not popped in the picture though)
  • 2 umeboshi plums (top right)
  • Tahini drizzzzzled on top

Tonight I had a macro-ish meal from the nearby Chinese takeout place. It was just scallops and veggies in a very light white sauce over white rice.

Even when I’m not trying, my dinners end up kind of macrobiotic-ish these days.

SO – Macrobiotic March is wrapping up. I have covered a lot of topics but are there any other questions at all that you guys have about macrobiotics that I haven’t answered yet? Even if I don’t know the answer I’d be happy to research it and give my thoughts.

But don’t worry – just because Macro March is almost over doesn’t mean I won’t be doing macrobiotic posts. I loved posting this month and I will definitely continue to talk about my macro finds.

P.S. I updated my Macrobiotics page – just in time for Macro March to end 😉

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